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Carson Robertson
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Quadruped With Weights for Back and Shoulder Strength

The Quadruped exercise is designed to increase strength and endurance in the back, shoulder, and neck. By adding weights the difficulty of the exercise increases, and also the risk of injury. This exercise should once again be performed in a pain free range of motion. You should have mastered the Quadruped exercise without weights for 3 sets of 10 before attempting this exercise.

If it hurts, stop or do not go that far into extension. It is better to perform fewer higher quality repetitions than more repetitions with poor form. NO CHEATING! Use a lighter weight as necessary, or only use the weight for half of the repetitions until you strength increases.

This exercise also works with the cross crawl exercise to enhance muscle pattern development.

Begin on all fours with weights in both your hands. Keeping your back and arm straight, slowly raise your right arm until it is even with your body. Pause in the up position and slowly return the weight to the ground.

Keeping your arm and back straight, repeat the motion with your left arm, lifting until it is even with your body. Pause in the up position and slowly return the weight to the ground. Repeat the exercise, alternating between right and left arms for 8-10 repetitions.

Keeping your back and limbs straight, slowly raise your right arm and left leg until they are even with your body. Pause in the up position and slowly return your limbs to the ground.

Keeping your back and limbs straight, slowly raise your right arm and left leg until they are even with your body. Pause in the up position and slowly return your limbs to the ground. Repeat the exercise, alternating between right arm/left leg and left arm/right leg combinations for 8-10 repetitions.

The exercises can be made more difficult by adding leg weights, once against start light and slowly increase the weight. The exercises can also be performed on foam or something unstable to increase core muscle pattern development.

All exercises should be conducted through a comfortable range of motion. If pain is felt, conduct the motion through the pain free range of motion, stopping just before the pain is felt. As progress is made with therapy and exercise, the pain free range of motion will be increased.