Physical-Therapy-Ball-Bridge-Chandler

Carson Robertson
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Bridging Exercises on Ball for Core Strength

Ball Bridging exercises are harder than exercises performed on the ground. They increase the difficulty and require the core muscle to work together achieve slow and controlled movements. Concentrate on slow and controlled up and down movements. The waist should be level.

Bridging with two feet apart or together

Back Exercise Bridge

Begin by positioning the stability ball under your shoulders and head. Ensure that your neck is in a neutral position on the ball. Place your feet shoulder width apart and position your hands to the side of the ball to stabilize yourself.

Back Exercise Bridge

Slowly and smoothly raise your hips until your body is straight. The angle between your thighs and calves should be roughly 90 degrees when in the up position. Pause in the up position then slowly lower your hips.

Ball Bridging Single Leg Modified Position

Back Exercise Bridge

Position yourself on the stability ball as outlined above. Raise your left foot 6 inches off the ground and then place it ontop of your right foot. In this position you will use approximately 70% strength from right foot and 30% from left. This will help build strength for the single leg bridge exercises. Perform the bridging movements as described above. Perform 8-10 repetitions on each leg, and alternate feet for each set.

Ball Bridging Single Leg Position

Back Exercise Bridge

Position yourself on the stability ball as outlined above. Raise your left foot 6 inches off the ground and perform the bridging movements as described above. Perform 8-10 repetitions and alternate feet for each set.

Ball Bridging Single Leg Extended Position

Back Exercise Bridge

Position yourself on the stability ball as outlined above. Raise your left foot off the ground and extend your knee completely. From this position perform the bridging movements as described above. Perform 8-10 repetitions and alternate feet for each set.

All exercises should be conducted through a comfortable range of motion. If pain is felt, conduct the motion through the pain free range of motion, stopping just before the pain is felt. As progress is made with therapy and exercise, the pain free range of motion will be increased.